The Auchindrain Trust
The Auchindrain Trust

Charity registered in Scotland SC015528

Step back in time and discover Scotland’s rural history at Auchindrain, the most complete and well-preserved example of a Scottish Highland farm township. Vividly imagine life in the old Highlands as you walk through the settlement and see how ordinary people lived and worked. Step into the restored longhouses, see the objects of everyday life and learn about the past inhabitants. Explore the byres, stables and fields to understand how groups of families worked the land in common. Uncover a fascinating, long-vanished Scottish way of life deep in the hills of Argyll.

Closed vacancies
This vacancy has now closed

Trustees

  • Management Board
  • Unpaid
  • Inveraray
  • Closing 30th November 2021

Bail’ Ach’ an Droighinn/Auchindrain Historic Township

Bail’ Ach’ an Droighinn/Auchindrain Historic Township is an internationally-significant historic site in Mid Argyll, which has been run as an independent museum since the 1960s. The site has “sole survivor” status as the last of the thousands of joint tenancy “townships”, the small agricultural communities that were the predominant form of rural settlement in Scotland up to the start of industrialisation and agricultural improvement in the late 18th century. The museum holds one of Scotland’s 50 Recognised Collections. Full details including an interactive guide can be found at auchindrain.org.uk.

Additional Trustees

Urras Achadh an Droighinn/The Auchindrain Trust is now seeking to appoint a number of additional Trustees to help enable major change in the museum’s public profile, and in its activities to build user numbers and generate earned income. Indications of interest are now invited from individuals who are outward-looking movers, shakers and influencers, who can either win the hearts and minds of others so they will support us, or bring ideas and experience to help us attract people and income in a challenging rural location. Any personal or professional background may be relevant, but we would particularly appreciate experience in marketing and brand development, in community engagement, and in securing sponsorship and in-kind support. We would also welcome an experienced senior museum professional (working or recently retired) who thoroughly understands the organisational and business dynamics of independent museums.

The Role

Trustees are not expected to be involved in the museum’s day-to-day operations, and an executive sub-group supports the Convenor in handling day-to-day governance and operational matters. They are expected to attend 4-6 meetings a year, usually in person although remote participation is possible. Between meetings, they are expected to able to make a measured commitment to the Trust’s business and ambitions, applying their practical or professional experience and contacts. This may be to support the senior staff with specific expertise, or to develop relationships with external bodies and individuals of interest. Trustees will also be expected to respond substantively to emailed messages and documents about the museum’s affairs and development, and to visit the museum with sufficient regularity to keep abreast of people and progress. Trustees serve for three years, after which they may be reappointed for a further term.

Personal Qualities

Trustees should have:

  • ‘networking’ skills, to connect with and influence outside institutions and individuals;
  • a background of specialist skill in a particular area, to act as a sounding-board for and to support, Trustee and senior staff initiatives;
  • the capacity to develop an understanding of financial, fundraising, marketing and heritage issues;
  • an appreciation of the mission of the museum as the custodian of a nationally-important collection, and as a charity;
  • skills in people-management.

Remuneration

Trustees do not receive payment, but may claim out-of-pocket expenses as necessary.

Shortlist